‘Inside the cocoon of long-held poses, we can turn towards and track our passing states of being. This breeds an emotional flexibility and resiliency.’ ~ Sarah Powers.

Session Aims

In coupling these two paths of yoga, these workshops also aim to demonstrate through practice how they nurture the balance of dynamic yang energy, in elevating and expanding it through Kundalini Yoga, and yin energy, in restoring and conserving it through Yin Yoga. Regardless of whether one takes a traditional approach, by tracing these paths back to their ancient origins, or a modern approach, by unpacking the significance of the basic principles and numerous techniques, both Kundalini and Yin work deliberately with one’s inward-focused mental experiences (emotion, intention and introspection) and one’s energetic body (vital energy or life force).

What These Sessions Include
  • Kundalini Yoga session (Yang Energy);
  • Yin Yoga session (Yin Energy);
  • Closing meditation;
  • Healthy bites and tea;
  • Practice workbooklet; and
  • One-to-one tutorial (optional).
About the Combination of Kundalini Yoga & Yin Yoga

Kundalini Yoga elevates and expands one’s energy by directing it upwards along spinal column, from the base of the spine (the tailbone) to the top of the head (the crown). This signifies its focus of bringing energy upwards and outwards to the crown and beyond. Kundalini energy resides at the base of spine, and is often depicted as a coiled snake, waiting to be activated and released. The purpose for this elevation and expansion of energy is to heighten own’s consciousness. As such Kundalini is a Yang practice. There are other dynamic practices, such as Ashtanga Yoga, that work in the same manner to elevate and expand one’s energy. However, Kundalini Yoga differs greatly in that it works with the energetic body (the chakra system, nadi and prana), as well as emotions and intention, rather than the physical body alone. As such, it tends to be understood as an advanced practice and works in a quicker and more profound way in comparison to other Yang practices. 

Yang practices are generally dynamic and expressive. Yang is characterised as masculine in quality. In the familiar Taoist symbol Yin-Yang, Yang is white and ampler at the top-right of the circle (representing the crown of the head in the body). It is a practice for the fast path to awakening. 

Yin Yoga restores and conserves one’s energy by directing it downwards, from the top of the head (the crown) to the base of the spine (the tailbone). The purpose for this restoration and conservation of energy is to ground oneself and counter the excessiveness and imbalance of the more dominant Yang lifestyle most of us lead modern societies. As such, as the name suggests, it is a Yin practice. There are other Yin practices, such as grounding meditations, that work in the same manner. However, Yin Yoga differs greatly in that it also works explicitly with the energetic body (the five phases system, meridians and qi) as well as emotions and introspection. As such, it is often a deeper practice and works in an intense and more profound way in comparison to other Yin practices. 

Yin practices are generally static and calming. Yin is characterised as feminine in quality. In the familiar Taoist symbol Yin-Yang, Yin is black and ampler at the bottom-left of the circle (representing the base of the spine in the body). This signifies its focus of bringing energy down towards the ground. It is a practice for the slow path to awakening. 

See Also:

Awakening: Fast Slow & Integral; Bodywork; Mindwork; Breathwork; Resource Library

£50 per session, on the first Saturday of the month